As we’ve been rather thoroughly discussing over the past few weeks, gender and diagnoses of older children or young adults are two areas of autism research and treatment that still require much greater understanding and research. Last week, we looked at a recent study that cemented the commonly held belief that girls tend to be diagnosed with autism at a far lesser rate than their male counterparts and tend to be diagnosed at an older age.

This week, we will look at a couple of brand new studies that both shed greater light on the differences between autism diagnoses in boys and girls while looking at one case in particular in which a young woman of 21 years old was diagnosed with autism and how she managed to successfully adjust her life to adapt to the condition.

http://time.com/3855645/autism-gender-differences/

http://www.refinery29.com/2015/05/87279/autistic-girl-removed-from-united-airlines-flight#.9lalqo:eksL

http://www.wsj.com/articles/diagnosed-with-autism-at-21and-ok-with-it-1431456000

http://deadline.com/2015/05/disney-new-autistic-kids-lawsuit-theme-parks-1201425571/

http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2015/05/12/Study-Inherited-gene-mutations-may-cause-autism/9841431457409/

https://www.yahoo.com/parenting/what-really-causes-autism-118721896887.html